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2017 Convention & Expo
 
Registration, general sessions, convention workshops, program sessions, posters, program chair featured sessions, Representative Assemby, Student Forum and the Expo will be located in the Hynes Convention Center.
 
Hynes Convention Center
900 Boylston Street
Boston, MA 02115
4/19/2017 - 4/22/2017

 

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Program
 
   

Wednesday, 19 April 2017Collapse
 
8:00 AM
CEC is going digital. The program in its entirety will be available via CEC's mobile APP. Don't want to use the mobile app to navigate the convention--Buy a bound copy of the 2017 convention program. $5

4/19/2017 8:00 AM - 4/22/2017 4:00 PM
9:00 AM
Congratuations on your acceptance! You received an email confirming your status now it is time to register. Thank you.

4/19/2017 9:00 AM - 4/22/2017 4:00 PM
9:00 AM

4/19/2017 9:00 AM - 4/22/2017 12:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #10 - Co-Teaching: Putting All the Pieces Together fo04r Student Success Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Leader: Marilyn Friend, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Co-teaching has become an increasingly utilized service delivery option that affects many students, including those from diverse groups. However, merely placing students with disabilities in general education classrooms and encouraging their teachers to work together is not sufficient for achieving improved results. In this overview session we will explore three major dimensions essential to contemporary, outcomes-driven co-teaching: (a) the updated roles and responsibilities of both general and special educators in the co-taught class (let's get past the marriage metaphor); (b) specially designed instruction (SDI) in co-teaching (otherwise, why are we doing this?); and (c) co-teaching structures, including creative and effective variations of them (going beyond the traditional six approaches). After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Analyze the differences between co-teaching of the past and co-teaching in the present, focusing on the importance of specially designed instruction, the distinction from inclusion, and the rationale for contemporary co-teaching. Apply six co-teaching approaches and variations of them to relevant subject matter and grade levels. Identify at least three logistical problems that affect co-teaching quality and employ realistic strategies to resolve them (e.g., class composition, scheduling, planning time). Evaluate your current co-teaching practices against the evidence base provided by policy, the professional research literature, and practitioner evidence, articulating at least two changes to improve implementation and outcomes.

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #11 - Understanding Students With Mental Health Needs: Strategies and Supports for Educators and Families Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. In this workshop, the presenter will introduce and define specific mental health diagnoses and what these diagnoses entail with a focus on anxiety disorders, mood disorders, OCD, PTSD/trauma, and tic disorders. For each disorder, you will engage in activities to help you understand what the student is experiencing and what strategies and supports have been found effective in school and in the student's life. You'll explore resources for more information and join in a time for Q&A at the end. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Define or describe mental health disabilities (anxiety disorders, mood disorders, OCD, PTSD/trauma, and tic disorders). Identify strategies to address issues related to these disabilities. Identify strategies that are commonly used in schools but that are not helpful for children and youth who are experiencing mental illness.

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #12 - A New President and Congress: Implications for Federal Education Policy! Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Leader: Deborah Ziegler, Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, Va. In this wide-ranging session, CEC's Policy and Advocacy Director will introduce you to the new policy players, present pending federal education policies supported by the new Administration and Congress and examine their impact on children and youth with exceptionalities and the professionals who work on their behalf. Participants will learn about CEC's positions on IDEA, HEA, Perkins, and ESRA Reauthorization, the federal budget and new and pending guidance/regulations from the U.S. Department of Education. Join us to find out how the outcome of the 2016 election may impact special and gifted education and early intervention and about CEC's advocacy initiatives. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Identify and discuss key special/gifted education policy issues under consideration by the new Administration and Congress. Discuss CEC's positions and advocacy initiatives on key policy issues.

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop 1 - Administrators: What You Need to Know About Special Education Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Leaders: David Bateman, Shippensburg University, Shippensburg, Pa.; Jenifer Cline, Great Falls Public Schools, Mont. This workshop is designed for administrators and focuses upon the main issues of special education: The rise in EBD, disproportionality, how to identify other health impaired, 504, accountability, discipline, preventing litigation, word choice, and least restrictive environment. The more an administrator knows for both general and special education- the better the overall services will be for children with disabilities. The materials of the workshop are based on the contents and research behind the book, "A Principal's Guide to Special Education, Third Edition," published by CEC. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Have clear strategies for preventing litigation relating to special education. Understand your role in serving students with 504 plans. Understand your role in identifying students as eligible for OHI. Understand your role in serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders.

Administration/Supervision
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop 2 - Bring It On: Applying UDL to Collaborative Planning Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Leaders: Loui Lord Nelson, RAISE, Inc., Indianapolis; Patty Kelly Ralabate, George Washington University, Washington, D.C. Learn how the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework can guide all educators in taking collaborative planning to the next level. Related service providers and special educators bring skills, strategies, and scaffolds into general education settings to support specific students but their engagement in lesson planning may be limited. Educators need a common lens for viewing instruction and learning that UDL provides. Utilizing a case-based collaborative planning format, we focus on how general education, related service providers, and special educators can collaboratively apply the UDL lens to effectively co-design the general education learning environment. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Articulate the key aspects of the UDL framework to fellow educators. Apply the UDL principles to design all learning environments. Define a meaningful assessment plan for their environment. Identify and collaboratively apply UDL lesson design to meaningful case scenarios.

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop 3: Program Developer Workshop: How to Prepare the Program Recognition Report Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Leader: Joni Baldwin, University of Dayton, Ohio In this interactive workshop, you will learn the components of CEC Preparation Program Recognition Reports. All participants will receive CEC program developer resources. You will come away better prepared to develop program performance-based assessments, align them with the CEC content standards, and prepare the final program report. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Describe the CEC program recognition report process and list its essential elements. Develop program performance-based assessments and align them with the CEC Content Standards. Develop the program report.

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop 4: Program Reviewer Workshop: How to Review CEC Program Recognition Reports Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Leader: Christy Hooser, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston Note: This workshop is offered at no cost for approved applicants. Please submit your vita and a completed application to prostandards@cec.sped.org. Participants will be expected to review CEC Program Recognition Reports during the Spring 2017 cycle. Principles for and examples of performance-based program review, and strategies for reviewing reports and for successfully writing the sections of the CEC Program Recognition Review will be discussed. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Explain the steps and components in reviewing a CEC Preparation Program Recognition Report. Ensure that program assessments align with the major elements of the CEC Content Standards.

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #5 - Developing Legally Defensible IEPs Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Leader: Julie Weatherly, Resolutions in Special Education, Inc., Mobile, Ala. The U.S. Supreme Court has referred to the Individualized Education Program (IEP) as the "modus operandi" for the provision of FAPE to students with disabilities. In accordance with the Court's two-pronged test for determining whether an IEP is appropriate, hearing officers and courts will look to both the procedural and substantive components of the IEP. Let's examine many common pitfalls that educators must avoid-both procedurally and substantively-in an effort to ensure that IEPs are legally defensible. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Recognize common procedural and substantive mistakes made in the development of IEPs that have significant legal implications. Participate appropriately in IEP meetings. Facilitate IEP team members and meetings in a way that will assist in avoiding legal disputes.

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop 6 - Must-Know Legal and Ethical Issues Involving Paraeducator Employment, Supervision, and Training Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Leader: Kent Gerlach, Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, Wash. This workshop session will provide an overview of the most current legal and ethical issues involving the employment, training, supervision, and evaluation of paraeducators, In addition the prevention will prove practical information and activities to enhance the knowledge and skills of administrators and teachers to effectively supervise paraeducators, Criteria for developing appropriate job descriptions will be shared Recent legal and ethical cases involving paraeducator training and supervision will be discussed. An update on IDEA and ESSA reauthorization will be addressed. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Understand the professional and ethical guidelines for the appropriate utilization of paraeducators in instruction, including the overreliance of paraeducators as one-to-one supports. Understand the quality indicators of effective staff development for paraeducators and their supervisors. Understand the legal and ethical issues in order to clarify the roles of teachers, paraeducators, and principals. Receive CEC knowledge and skill bases for paraeducators and ECEC social Education Professional Ethical Principles and practice standards.

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #7 - Preparing Students With Disabilities for Successful Transition to College Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Leader: Elizabeth Hamblet, Columbia University, New York Research shows that preparing students with disabilities for success at college involves educating them about changes they will find in the postsecondary environment and making sure that they develop certain skills. But many educators, related professionals, and families don't know about the legal and systematic differences in disability services that affect these students, so students may not get the preparation they need. This workshop will review the shift in laws at college, how the disability services system works, accommodations that will likely be available to students there, and what skills and knowledge the research shows are correlated with students' success. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Describe how the disability accommodations system works at college. Identify what accommodations may or may not be available at the college level. Identify what documentation students will need in order to apply for accommodations at college. Identify what skills and areas of knowledge have been linked with postsecondary success for students with disabilities.

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #8 - THINK DEVELOPMENTALLY! Linking Classroom Practice to Assessment, Achievement, and Accountability Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Leaders: Mary M. Wood, Developmental Therapy Institute, Athens, Ga.; Constance Quirk, Developmental Therapy Institute, Athens, Ga. This hands-on workshop introduces proven classroom practices from Developmental Therapy-Developmental Teaching (DT-DT) to foster social-emotional, and behavioral competencies needed by all students Pre-K to grade 12. You will use case material to assess students for IEP objectives, prepare behavior management plans, group students, select developmentally appropriate teaching practices, and document teacher effectiveness. We will demonstrate how DT-DT enhances instructional continuity and accountability across multi-tiered placements with MTSS, PBIS, social skills programs, and academic curricula. Workshop materials are applicable to, and used by, teachers, support teachers, psychologists, social workers, and parents. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Successfully use a developmentally based assessment with actual student cases to obtain IEP objectives for students' social-emotional and behavioral development. Use assessment results to design one elementary and one secondary developmentally based behavior management plan with corresponding recommended teacher practice. Apply metrics from assessment results to document individual and group progress and to compare student progress with age peers. Assess your own effectiveness in using developmentally appropriate classroom practices.

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #9 - Administrators & Mentors: You Can Help New Special Education Teachers Thrive in the Classroom! Wednesday, April 19, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Leaders: Clara Hauth, Marymount University, Arlington, Va.; Catherine Creighton Martin, Fairfax County Public Schools, Va. This session is designed for administrators and mentors of new special education teachers. Materials to support them will be discussed and include clearly defined roles and responsibilities, creating a culture of collaboration and the development of skills to create and schedule time and build relationships with your new teachers. The materials of the workshop are based on the contents and research behind the book, "A Principal's Guide to Special Education, Third Edition," published by CEC. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Utilize resources and information regarding building relationships to support new special education teachers throughout their first year and beyond. Share evidence based practices and help new teachers build a toolbox of strategies for the classroom. Create and develop effective planning and supports for new teacher evaluations. Develop and implement effective collaboration supports for new special education teachers with co-teachers, paraprofessionals, general educators, families, and staff.

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
1:00 PM
Sessions 1:00 pm to 4:30 pm; Opening General Session, 5:00-6:30 pm; Welcome Reception and Expo Grand Opening

1:00 PM - 8:30 PM
1:00 PM
Wednesday, April 19 - Half Day - 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Workshop #13 - Co-Teaching: We Know the Basics…What's Next? Wednesday, April 19, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Leader: Marilyn Friend, University of North Carolina at Greensboro Many teachers, administrators, and other professionals are well schooled on the basics of co-teaching, but they still find that achieving the outcomes it promises can be a daunting task. Based on the assumption that participants understand foundational knowledge about co-teaching, this workshop instead will be on topics that are more complex, more subtle, and especially critical for success. Domains that will be included are these: instructional approaches and strategies that constitute specially designed instruction in co-teaching (including examples observed in co-taught classes), the use of data in co-teaching (for instructional planning as well as delivery of services related to IEP goals), program evaluation (what outcomes are being achieved), and issues related to administrative responsibilities and accountability. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Analyze the quality of instruction in your co-taught classes and prioritize how that instruction could be refined in order to better meet the needs of students with disabilities and improve their outcomes. Identify strategies for gathering co-teaching data at the classroom, school, district, and community levels and select at least one option to implement. Evaluate rigor in their co-teaching programs against criteria such as curriculum standards, class membership, and the relationship between student need and amount of co-teaching promised); Compare local practices to those recommended regarding personnel assigned to co-teaching, planning time for co-teachers, and fidelity of implementation. Apply a checklist related to professional roles and responsibilities to examine whether co-teachers' are appropriately distinguishing between their classroom practices and are addressing simultaneously the general curriculum and specially designed instruction.

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
1:00 PM
Workshop #14 - Resilience-Based Interaction Model (RIM): Supporting Children's Behavioral and Mental Health Wednesday, April 19, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Leaders: Mojdeh Bayat, DePaul University, Chicago; Heather Little, DePaul University, Chicago This workshop is designed for professionals who work with children, particularly in early childhood and elementary years, in or outside of classrooms. You'll learn about Resilience-Based Interaction Model (RIM) and how it supports the child's mental and behavioral health by reducing inappropriate behaviors, setting limits and boundaries for behavior, enhancing child's understanding of self and others' emotions, promoting problem solving and expression of emotions, and enhancing child's capabilities for self-discipline. The presenters will provide background information and basic skills for educators to move in the direction of understanding and promoting children's behavioral and mental health and wellbeing. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Understand the theoretical background and framework of RIM. Understand general causes of mental health issues in children. Learn basic components and principles and the key techniques and methods in RIM. Understand when and how to use Techniques involved in RIM.

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
1:00 PM
Workshop #15 - Taking Charge! How to Promote Self-Regulated Learning Every Day Wednesday, April 19, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Leader: Leslie Laud, thinkSRSD, Wellesley, Mass. How do we help our students self-regulate so they can take charge of directing their own learning? Although there is a tremendous amount of research on self-regulated learning, we will share real examples from dozens of schools working to translate this research into actual practice and into the fabric of their school culture. Hear practical steps that teachers use to weave formative assessment, supports for executive function, explicit instruction, goal setting, mindfulness, and self-monitoring into their daily teaching. Learn about the significant growth their students made in self-regulating and on standardized assessments. You will leave with many practical tools and ideas you can use immediately. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Understand practical steps you can take to integrate self-regulated learning into the fabric of their daily teaching. Receive broken-down sets of explicit steps students must take to be able to self-regulate (what are the steps in solving a word problem or writing a paragraph). Receive tools, and guidance on how to use these, to help students self-regulate - such as how to make and use a self-regulation plan. Identify the stages learners go through in learning how to self-regulate and how teachers can scaffold to help move students through these stages.

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
1:00 PM
Workshop #16 - What's the Deal With Assistive Technology? A Dynamic Conversation Wednesday, April 19, 1:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. Leaders: Jamie Nichols, Long Beach Unified School District, Calif.; Erik Larson, Long Beach Unified School District, Calif.; Katie Field, Long Beach Unified School District, Calif. This dynamic workshop will support teachers, parents, school administrators, and assistive technology specialists as they consider AT devices for communication and academics. Learn the secrets and best practices of an organized AT Department, and about available tools and technology. Get all your AT questions answered in a Q&A session at the session's close. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Know when to check "yes" on the Assistive Devices section of the IEP and who on the IEP team is qualified to consider assistive technology accommodations. Describe the best practices of an organized AT Department, including acquiring devices, team organization and assessments. Identify various AT/AAC tools.

1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Thursday, 20 April 2017Collapse
 
8:00 AM
Second General Session, 8:00-9:00 AM; 9:00-9:45 AM Expo Hall Only time; Sessions 9:45am-4:30 pm; 4:30-5:00 p.m. Expo Hall Only time

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday, 21 April 2017Collapse
 
8:00 AM
Third General Session, 8:00-9:00 am; 9:00-9:45 am Expo Only Time; Sessions 9:45am-5:00 pm; EXPO CLOSES AT 2PM.

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday, 22 April 2017Collapse
 
8:00 AM
Sessions 8:00AM-3:15PM; Half-day workshops (require an additional registration fee), 9:00AM - 12:00PM. NO EXPO ON SATURDAY.

8:00 AM - 3:15 PM
9:00 AM
Saturday, April 22 - Half Day - 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Workshop #17 - Charting the Course: Special Education & Charter Schools Saturday, April 22, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Leaders: Azure D.S. Angelov, University of Indianapolis; David Bateman, Shippensburg University, Penn. Are there promising special education practices emerging in charters schools? What can we learn about special education from these new educational settings? Join us as we discuss multiple perspectives and innovative practices emerging in special education from the charter school sector and provide an overview of the current state of special education in charter schools. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Gain an in-depth and current understanding of the trends, issues, and topics impacting special education services and practices in the charter school sector. Engage in idea sharing and see examples of emerging innovative practices taking place specific to special education in charter school contexts.

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #18 - Creating Culturally Responsive Education to Address Disproportionality: Seeking Equity Saturday, April 22, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Leader: Donna Ford, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. The overrepresentation of Black students, especially males, in special education has a long history. Annually, the Office for Civil Rights presents data indicating these students are overrepresented in high incidence categories (e.g., emotional and behavioral disorders). These data, juxtaposed with the lack of diversity among educators, have been viewed as a significant part of the problem. We will address teacher biases and stereotypes, including becoming culturally competent. Models and strategies are shared in this session, along with resources. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Identify two models of cultural competence. Identity five areas of cultural competence. Identify at least five factors that contribute to overrepresentation.

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #19 - Differentiation Made Simple: Change Your Favorite Lessons Into Differentiated Ones Saturday, April 22, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Leaders: Tracy Inman, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green; Julia Roberts, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green Teachers mistakenly believe that differentiating the curriculum means creating completely differentiated lessons for each topic. Not so! Join us and learn how to tweak your favorite lessons by focusing on content, process, and product and students' distinct learning needs, interests, and levels of readiness. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Create a tiered lesson appropriate for a variety of learners using Venn. Identify high-level, challenging learning experiences. Create a tiered lesson appropriate for a variety of learners using Bloom's Taxonomy and a Bloom Chart

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #20 - Innovative Practices in Classroom and Behavior Management Saturday, April 22, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Leader: Kimberly Vannest, Texas A&M University, College Station Learn how you can improve classroom behavior in general and special education classroom settings while addressing social emotional learning in K-12 students. These lessons use examples of respect, problem solving, self-advocacy, and citizenship. Characteristics of adaptability, leadership, and self-control are described using interesting and unusual animal illustrations. The presenter share strategies that are grounded in evidence-based practices and effective instruction and that also corresponds with social emotional learning of self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision making. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Implement lesson plans, examples, strategies, and action plans for class-wide prevention and intervention upon returning to a classroom, campus, or district. Develop knowledge and practices in 9 unit areas of classroom and behavior management. Identify common barriers in implementation.

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
9:00 AM
Workshop #21 - Seamless Transition: Why and How Saturday, April 22, 9:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Leader: Nancy Fones, Council for Exceptional Children, Arlington, Va. Presenters: Donna Wandry, West Chester University, Pa.; Jill Kulwicki, Flagler County Schools, Bunnell, Fla. A prominent transition expert will discuss the most recent legislative developments affecting transition services mandated by IDEA, and suggest curricular resources to address LEA challenges in providing transition services. Following this discussion, an experienced classroom practitioner will present the functionalities of CEC's Internet-based transition curriculum (LCE) and the ways the LCE curriculum tracks student progress, amenable to IEP updates. After completing this workshop, you will be able to: Understand the legalities of providing transition services within the school experience. Refresh your knowledge about IDEA and Indicator 13 transition service requirements. Recognize the need for data-based decision making concerning postsecondary plans. Replicate steps that measure student progress; transfer LCE data to IEP goals

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM